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Category Archives: Expos

Steve Renko – 1973 Topps#623

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   Steve Renko, Jr. (born December 10, 1944 in Kansas City, Kansas) is a former right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball for the Montreal Expos (1969–1976), Chicago Cubs (1976–1977), Chicago White Sox (1977), Oakland Athletics (1978), Boston Red Sox (1979–1980), California Angels (1981–1982) and Kansas City Royals (1983). He helped the Angels win the 1982 American League Western Division, with a win/loss of 11-6. Steve was a 15 game winner in 1971 and 1973, led the National League in earned runs allowed (115) in 1971, led the National League in wild pitches (19) in 1974, and he ranks 99th on the career home runs allowed List (248). In 15 seasons he had a 134-146 win-loss record, 451 games, 365 games started, 57 complete games, 9 shutouts, 36 games finished, 6 saves, 2,494 innings pitched, 2,438 hits allowed, 1,233 runs allowed, 1,107 earned runs allowed, 248 home runs allowed, 1,010 walks allowed, 1,455 strikeouts, 22 hit batsmen, 73 wild pitches, 10,704 batters faced, 86 intentional walks, 4 balks and a 3.99 earned run average. In 1979, he carried a no-hitter into the ninth inning against the Oakland A’s in Oakland, only to be broken up by a Rickey Henderson double with one out in the bottom of the ninth. Renko pitched 5 career one-hitters.

John Strohmayer – Topps #457

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John Emery Strohmayer (born October 13, 1946 in Belle Fourche, South Dakota) He was drafted by the Oakland Athletics in 1968, and made his Major League debut in 1970 for the Montreal Expos. He played with them until the July 1973, when he was claimed by the New York Mets off waivers. He played with them until 1974. John had a career 11-9 win-loss record with a 4.47 Earned Run Average and 200 strikeouts. In 1999 Strohmayer was inducted to the Pacific Athletics Hall of Fame for his outstanding performance with the Pacific Tigers there.

Clyde Mashore – 1973 Topps #401

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Clyde Wayne Mashore (born May 29, 1945 in Concord, California) was an outfielder who played in 241 games over five seasons for the Cincinnati Reds and Montreal Expos of the National League. He batted and threw right-handed. Mashore was signed by the Reds prior to the 1964 season as an amateur free agent. He was then drafted by the New York Mets in the 1967 Rule 5 draft, but was returned to the Reds the following spring. He made his major league debut over a year later. During the 1970 season he was traded to the Expos for Ty Cline. Mashore got the most playing time in Montreal, appearing in 93 games in 1972. Mashore’s son Damon Mashore played 3 major league seasons for the Oakland Athletics and Anaheim Angels.

Balor Moore – 1973 Topps #211

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Balor Lilbon Moore(born January 25, 1951)  He was the first player drafted by the expansion Montreal Expos in the 1969 Major League Baseball Draft. Moore tore up the Gulf Coast League and Florida State League his first professional baseball season, going a combined 9-1 with a 0.41 earned run average at the Rookie and High A levels. After going 3-0 with a 0.72 ERA for the High A West Palm Beach Expos to start the 1970 season, Moore made the jump all the way to the triple A Buffalo Bisons. He made his major league debut on May 21 against the Pittsburgh Pirates. He faced one batter, Willie Stargell, who lined out to left field. He pitched a total of 9.2 innings in the majors, going 0-2 with a 7.45 ERA. Moore struggled in 1972, going 2-11 with a 6.33 ERA for triple A Winnipeg. After a year in the army, Moore went 5-3 with a 0.63 ERA for the double A Quebec Carnavals in 1972 to earn a second promotion to Montreal. Moore spent the final three seasons of his career with the Blue Jays, going 12-17 with a 4.96 ERA. He earned a four inning save for the only save of his career on April 27, 1980 against the Milwaukee Brewers. He spent 1981 in the minors with the Brewers and Houston Astros before retiring.

Terry Humphrey – 1973 Topps #106


Terryal Gene Humphrey (born August 4, 1949, in Chickasha, Oklahoma) is a former professional baseball player who played nine seasons for the Montreal Expos, Detroit Tigers, and California Angels of Major League Baseball.

Ken Singleton – 1973 Topps #232


Kenneth Wayne Singleton(born June 10, 1947) is an American former professional baseball player and current television sports commentator. He played as an outfielder and designated hitter in Major League Baseball for the New York Mets, Montreal Expos, and Baltimore Orioles. In a fifteen-year major league career, Singleton played in 2,082 games, accumulating 2,029 hits in 7,189 at bats for a .282 career batting average along with 246 home runs, 1,065 runs batted in and an on base percentage of .388. He had a career .980 fielding percentage. Singleton ranks among the Orioles all-time leaders in numerous offensive statistics. An All-Star in 1977, 1979 and 1981, he won the Roberto Clemente Award in 1982. His highest finish in the Most Valuable Player Award balloting was in 1979, when he finished second to Don Baylor. He was third in 1977, behind Al Cowens and the winner, Rod Carew.

Boots Day – 1973 Topps #307


Charles Frederick “Boots” Day(born August 31, 1947) is a retired American professional baseball outfielder. A native of Ilion, New York, Day played Major League Baseball for all or parts of six seasons (1969–74), with the bulk of that time spent with the Montreal Expos. He threw and batted left-handed, stood 5 feet 9 inches tall and weighed 160 pounds. Day originally signed with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1966, and received a Major League trial with the Cardinals in 1969, playing in 11 games and going hitless in six at bats. At the close of the season, he was traded to the Chicago Cubs for left-handed pitcher Rich Nye. He made the Cubs’ opening day 1970 roster, but was soon traded again, in May, to Montreal for veteran catcher Jack Hiatt. After further seasoning in Triple-A, at Buffalo and Winnipeg, he was recalled by the Expos and played the next three-plus seasons as Montreal’s platoon center fielder. In 1971, his best Major League campaign, he reached career highs in hits (105), home runs (4), runs batted in (33), and batting average (.283) in 122 games played. After slumping in 1972, he returned to form the following season, batting .275 in 101 games in 1973. But the Expos acquired veteran center fielder Willie Davis in an offseason blockbuster trade with the Los Angeles Dodgers, and Day lost his semi-regular job. After only 52 games and 72 at bats in 1974, he returned to the minor leagues for the remainder of his playing career.

Montreal Expos 1973 Team Photo – 1973 Topps #576

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The Montreal Exposwere a Major League Baseball team located in Montreal, Quebec from 1969 through 2004, holding the first MLB franchise awarded outside the United States. After the 2004 season, MLB moved the Expos to Washington, D.C. and renamed them the Nationals. Named after the Expo 67 World’s Fair, the Expos started play at Jarry Park Stadium under manager Gene Mauch. The team’s initial majority owner was Charles Bronfman, a major shareholder in Seagram. Following the 1976 Summer Olympics, starting in 1977 the team’s home venue was Montreal’s Olympic Stadium. After a decade of losing seasons, the team won a franchise-high 95 games in 1979, finishing second in the National League East. The Expos began the 1980s with a core group of young players, including catcher Gary Carter, outfielders Tim Raines and Andre Dawson, third baseman Tim Wallach, and pitchers Steve Rogers and Bill Gullickson. The team won its only division championship in the strike-shortened split season of 1981, ending its season with a 3 games to 2 loss to the Los Angeles Dodgers in the National League Championship Series. On September 29, 2004, the date of Montreal’s last home game of the season, MLB announced that the Montreal franchise would move to Washington, D.C. for the 2005 season. The Expos played their final game on October 3, 2004 at Shea Stadium, losing by a score of 8–1 against the New York Mets, the same opponent that the Expos first faced at its start, 35 years earlier. The Washington team was named the Washington Nationals, and retained all the Expos’ records, player contracts, and minor league affiliates, as well as their spring training complex in Viera, Florida.

Montreal Expos 1973 Team Checklist

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The Montreal Expos  The Montreal Expos (French: Les Expos de Montréal) were a Major League Baseball team located in Montreal, Quebec from 1969 through 2004, holding the first MLB franchise awarded outside the United States. After the 2004 season, MLB moved the Expos to Washington, D.C. and renamed them the Nationals. Named after the Expo 67 World’s Fair, the Expos started play at Jarry Park Stadium under manager Gene Mauch. The team’s initial majority owner was Charles Bronfman, a major shareholder in Seagram. Following the 1976 Summer Olympics, starting in 1977 the team’s home venue was Montreal’s Olympic Stadium. After a decade of losing seasons, the team won a franchise-high 95 games in 1979, finishing second in the National League East. The Expos began the 1980s with a core group of young players, including catcher Gary Carter, outfielders Tim Raines and Andre Dawson, third baseman Tim Wallach, and pitchers Steve Rogers and Bill Gullickson. The team won its only division championship in the strike-shortened split season of 1981, ending its season with a 3 games to 2 loss to the Los Angeles Dodgers in the National League Championship Series.

Gary Carter – 1976 Topps #441


Gary Edmund Carter  (born April 8, 1954), nicknamed “Kid” and “Kid Carter”, is an American former Major League Baseball catcher. During a 19-year baseball career, mostly with the Montreal Expos and the New York Mets, Carter established himself as one of the premier catchers in the National League, winning three Gold Glove awards and five Silver Slugger awards. He was inducted in the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in 2003 wearing the Expos cap. Carter split time between right field and catching his rookie season (1975), and was selected for the National League All-Star team as a right fielder. Though he did not get an at bat during the game, he came into the game as a defensive replacement for Pete Rose in the ninth inning, and caught Rod Carew’s fly ball for the final out of the NL’s 6-3 victory. Carter hit .270 with 17 home runs and 68 runs batted in, and finished second to San Francisco Giants pitcher John Montefusco for the National League Rookie of the Year award and receiving The Sporting News Rookie of the Year Award.
Carter also has been a very active philanthropist. Through The Gary Carter Foundation, of which Gary Carter is the President, Carter and his staff support 8 Title I schools in Palm Beach County whose students live immersed in poverty. Typically these schools will have 90% or more students eligible for free or reduced lunches. The Foundation seeks to “better the physical, mental and spiritual well being of children.” To accomplish this, they advocate “school literacy by encouraging use of the Reading Counts Program, a program that exists in the Palm Beach County School District.” Since its inception, The Gary Carter Foundation has placed over $622,000 toward charitable purposes, including $366,000 to local elementary schools for their reading programs.
In May 2011, Carter was diagnosed with four malignant tumors in his brain after complaining of headaches and forgetfulness. Doctors confirmed that he has Stage 4 glioblastoma, an extremely aggressive cancer. Doctors say that it is inoperable and Carter will undergo other treatment methods to shrink his tumor.

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