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Category Archives: Red Sox

Bob Montgomery – 1973 Topps #491

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Robert Edward Montgomery (born April 16, 1944 in Nashville, Tennessee) is a former Major League Baseball catcher who played in the American League for the Boston Red Sox from 1970 to 1979. He was known as “The Hammer” or “Monty”. For most of his career, Montgomery served as Boston’s backup catcher behind Hall of Famer Carlton Fisk (Fisk became the starter in 1972). In 387 career games, he compiled a .258 batting average with 23 home runs and 156 runs batted in. After his playing career, Montgomery spent fourteen seasons (1982 through 1995) as the color commentator for Red Sox telecasts on WSBK-TV 38. Montgomery now works for Big League Promotions which manufactures game boards using professional sports licensing. Montgomery was the last Major League player to bat without wearing a batting helmet, in 1979. Although helmets were mandated in 1971, players like Montgomery who were grandfathered in could choose to not wear one if they wished.

Rogelio Moret – 1973 Topps #291


Rogelio (Torres) “Roger” Moret (born September 16, 1949 in Guayama, Puerto Rico) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher who played for the Boston Red Sox (1970-1975), Atlanta Braves (1976) and Texas Rangers (1977-1978). In 168 games (82 as a starter and 86 as a reliever), he posted a career won-lost record of 47-27 and an earned run average of 3.66. Moret led the American League in winning percentage in both 1973 (.867) and 1975 (.824). His career ended in 1978 in a bizarre fashion. Scheduled to be the starting pitcher against the Detroit Tigers on April 12, Moret was spotted in the Ranger locker room in a catatonic state, with his arm extended holding a slipper. He was unresponsive to examiners, and was immediately taken to a psychiatric facility and went on the disabled list. He appeared in only six more games after the bizarre incident. In the film Fever Pitch, the incident was cited as an instance where the Curse of the Bambino struck the Red Sox, but this is an error, as Moret was no longer with that team.

John Curtis – 1973 Topps #143


John Duffield Curtis (born March 9, 1948 in Newton, Massachusetts) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher. He was originally drafted by the Cleveland Indians in the first round of the 1966 Major League Baseball Draft out of Smithtown High School in Smithtown, New York, but did not sign, choosing instead to attend Clemson University. After two seasons at Clemson, he was drafted by the Boston Red Sox in the first round of the secondary phase of the 1968 Major League Baseball Draft, and signed with the club. Curtis lives in Long Beach, California with his wife, Mary Ann. Upon retiring, Curtis began freelance writing articles for the San Diego Union-Tribune, Boston Globe, San Francisco Chronicle and Sports Illustrated.[8] After a nearly twenty year absence from the game, he returned to coach the Long Beach Breakers during the two year run of the independent Western Baseball League (2001 & 2002).

Carlton Fisk – 1974 Topps #105

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Carlton Ernest Fisk(born December 26, 1947), nicknamed “Pudge” or “The Commander”, is a former Major League Baseball catcher. During a 24-year baseball career, he played for both the Boston Red Sox (1969, 1971–1980) and Chicago White Sox (1981–1993). Fisk was known by the nickname “Pudge” due to his 6’2″, 220 lb frame. He was the first player to be unanimously voted American League Rookie of the Year (1972). Fisk is best known for “waving fair” his game-winning home run in the 12th inning of Game 6 of the 1975 World Series. At the time of his retirement in 1993, he held the record for most home runs all-time by a catcher with 351 (since passed by Mike Piazza). Fisk held the record for most games played at the position of catcher (2,226) until June 17, 2009 when he was surpassed by another “Pudge,” Iván Rodríguez. Fisk still holds the American League record for most years served behind the plate (24). Fisk was voted to the All-Star team 11 times and won 3 Silver Slugger Awards which is awarded annually to the best offensive player at each position. Fisk was known as a fierce competitor, a superb handler of pitchers and a natural on-field leader. He was elected to the Hall of Fame in 2000.

Jim Rice – 1976 Topps #340


James Edward “Jim” Rice (born March 8, 1953), nicknamed “Jim Ed”, is a former Major League Baseball left fielder. Jim Rice played his entire career for the Boston Red Sox from 1974 to 1989. An 8-time American League (AL) All-Star, he was named the AL’s Most Valuable Player in 1978 after becoming the first major league player in 19 years to hit for 400 total bases, and went on to become the ninth player to lead the major leagues in total bases in consecutive seasons, and join Ty Cobb as one of two players to lead the AL in total bases three years in a row. He batted .300 seven times, collected 100 runs batted in (RBI) eight times and 200 hits four times, and had eleven seasons with 20 home runs, also leading the league in home runs three times, RBIs and slugging average twice each. In the late 1970s he was part of one of the sport’s great outfields along with Fred Lynn and Dwight Evans, who was his teammate for his entire career; Rice continued the tradition of his predecessors Ted Williams and Carl Yastrzemski as a power-hitting left fielder who played his entire career for the Red Sox. He ended his career with a .502 slugging average, and then ranked tenth in AL history with 382 home runs; his career marks in homers, hits (2,452), RBI (1,451) and total bases (4,129) remain Red Sox records for a right-handed hitter, with Evans eventually surpassing his Boston records for career runs scored, at bats and extra base hits by a right-handed hitter. When Rice retired, his 1,503 career games in left field ranked seventh in AL history. Rice was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame on July 26, 2009, as the 103rd member voted in by the BBWAA.

Dwight Evans – 1974 Topps #351


Dwight Michael Evans (born November 3, 1951), nicknamed “Dewey”, is an American former professional baseball right fielder and right-handed batter who played with the Boston Red Sox (1972–90) and Baltimore Orioles (1991) in Major League Baseball. Evans won eight Gold Glove Awards (1976,1978-79 & 1981-85). In the 1970s and 1980s, Evans played in the outfield with future Hall of Famer Jim Rice as well as all-stars Fred Lynn and Tony Armas. From 1980 through 1989, Evans hit more home runs (256) than any other player in the American League. He also led the A.L. in extra base hits over the same period of time. He is the only player to hit 20 or more home runs during every season of the 80′s (1980–1989). Evans hit a home run four times on Opening Day. On April 7, 1986, he set a major league record by hitting the first pitch of the season for a home run, eclipsing the mark held by the Chicago Cubs’ Bump Wills, who hit the second pitch for a home run on April 4, 1982.

Carl Yastrzemski – 1974 Topps #280


Carl Michael Yastrzemski (born August 22, 1939) is a former American Major League Baseball left fielder and first baseman. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1989. Yastrzemski played his entire 23-year baseball career with the Boston Red Sox (1961–1983). He was primarily a left fielder, with part of his later career played at first base and as a designated hitter. Yastrzemski is an 18-time All-Star, the possessor of seven Gold Gloves, a member of the 3000 hit club, and the first American League player in that club to also accumulate over 400 home runs. He is second on the all-time list for games played, and third for total at-bats. He is the Red Sox’ all-time leader in career RBIs, runs, hits, singles, doubles, total bases, and games played, and is second on the team’s list for home runs behind another Red Sox great, Ted Williams, his predecessor in left field. In 1967, Yastrzemski achieved a peak in his career, leading the Red Sox to the American League pennant for the first time in over two decades, in that season being voted the American League MVP, and being the last winner of the triple crown for batters in the major leagues.

Wade Boggs – 1991 Donruss #178

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Wade Anthony Boggs (born June 15, 1958) is an American former professional baseball third baseman. He spent his 18-year baseball career primarily with the Boston Red Sox, but also played for the New York Yankees and Tampa Bay Devil Rays. His hitting in the 1980s and 1990s made him a perennial contender for American League batting titles, in much the same way as his National League contemporary Tony Gwynn. Boggs was elected to the Red Sox Hall of Fame in 2004 and the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2005. With 12 straight All-Star appearances, Boggs is third only to Brooks Robinson and George Brett in number of consecutive appearances as a third baseman. His finest season was 1987, when he set career highs in home runs (24), RBI (89), and slugging percentage (.588). He also batted .363 and had a .461 on-base percentage that year, leading the league in both statistics. In 1999, he ranked number 95 on the Sporting News list of the 100 Greatest Baseball Players, and was a nominee for the Major League Baseball All-Century Team.

Roger Clemens – 1991 Donruss #81

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William Roger Clemens  (born August 4, 1962), nicknamed “Rocket”, is a former Major League Baseball pitcher who broke into the league with the Boston Red Sox, whose pitching staff he would help anchor for 12 years. Clemens won seven Cy Young Awards, more than any other pitcher. He played for four different teams over his 23-year playing career. In each of his two seasons with the Toronto Blue Jays, Clemens won the pitching triple crown (leading the league in wins, ERA, and strikeouts) and a Cy Young Award. Clemens was traded to the New York Yankees for the 1999 season, where he had his first World Series success. In 2003, he reached his 300th win and 4,000th strikeout in the same game. Clemens is one of only four pitchers to have more than 4,000 strikeouts in their career (the others are pitchers Nolan Ryan, Randy Johnson, and Steve Carlton). Clemens played three seasons with the Houston Astros, where he won his seventh Cy Young Award. He rejoined the New York Yankees during the 2007 season. Clemens was alleged by the Mitchell Report to have used anabolic steroids during his late career, mainly because of testimony given by his former trainer, Brian McNamee. Clemens firmly denied these allegations under oath before Congress, leading congressional leaders to refer his case to the Justice Department on suspicions of perjury. On May 12, 2009, he broke a long silence to speak out on ESPN against American Icon: The Fall of Roger Clemens and the Rise of Steroids in America’s Pastime, a book by four New York Daily News reporters that claims Clemens used performance-enhancing drugs during his career. On August 19, 2010, a federal grand jury at the U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C., indicted Clemens on six felony counts involving perjury, false statements and obstruction of Congress. On August 30 he pleaded not guilty, and a trial date was set for April 5, 2011. On December 9, it was announced that the trial would be pushed back until July 2011. The trial began on July 13, 2011 but a mistrial was declared on the second day of testimony due to prosecutorial misconduct.

1972 Rookie Stars Red Sox – 1972 Topps #79

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Michael Douglas Garman  (born September 16, 1949 in Caldwell, Idaho) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher whom the Boston Red Sox selected with the third overall pick in the 1967 Major League Baseball Draft. His brother, Stephen, spent two seasons in the San Francisco Giants organization. Garman signed with the Red Sox upon graduation from Caldwell High School, and was assigned to the Greenville Red Sox of the Western Carolinas League. He lost the only game he appeared in for Greenville, giving up three hits and two walks in the only inning he pitched. He was then reassigned to the Winston-Salem Red Sox, where he went 1-3 with a 6.75 earned run average. After three seasons in Boston’s farm system, Garman debuted with the BoSox as a September call-up in 1969, and won his major league debut against the New York Yankees just six days after his twentieth birthday. After spending all of 1970 in the minors, he joined the Sox as a September call-up in 1971 and 1972 as well, and made the big league roster out of the bullpen in 1973. He had no decisions in twelve appearances as manager Eddie Kasko used him mostly in mop up rolls.

Cecil Celester Cooper (born December 20, 1949 in Brenham, Texas), nicknamed “Coop,” is a former first baseman in Major League Baseball and the former manager of the Houston Astros. From 1971 through 1987, Cooper played for the Boston Red Sox (1971–76) and Milwaukee Brewers (1977–87). He batted and threw left-handed, and attended Prairie View A&M University in Prairie View, Texas. A five-time All-Star, Cooper hit .300 or more from 1977 to 1983. His most productive season came in 1980, when he hit a career-high .352 (finishing second in the American League behind batting champion George Brett’s .390 average for the Kansas City Royals), and he also led the league in RBI (122) and total bases (335).

Carlton Ernest Fisk(born December 26, 1947), nicknamed “Pudge” or “The Commander”, is a former Major League Baseball catcher. During a 24-year baseball career, he played for both the Boston Red Sox (1969, 1971–1980) and Chicago White Sox (1981–1993). Fisk still holds the American League record for most years served behind the plate (24). Fisk was voted to the All-Star team 11 times and won 3 Silver Slugger Awards which is awarded annually to the best offensive player at each position. Fisk was known as a fierce competitor, a superb handler of pitchers and a natural on-field leader. He was elected to the Hall of Fame in 2000. The defining moment of Fisk’s illustrious career came in the 12th inning of Game 6 of the 1975 World Series at Fenway Park. He hit Cincinnati Reds pitcher Pat Darcy’s second pitch down the left field line that appeared to be heading into foul territory. The enduring image of Fisk jumping and waving the ball fair as he made his way to first base is considered by many to be one of baseball’s greatest moments. The ball struck the foul pole, giving the Red Sox a 7–6 win and forcing a seventh and deciding game of the fall classic. The image of him waving the ball fair changed the way baseball was televised. During this time, cameramen covering baseball were instructed to follow the flight of the ball. In a 1999 interview, NBC cameraman Lou Gerard admitted that the classic shot was not due to his own skills as a cameraman, but because he had been distracted by a nearby rat. Unable to follow the ball, he kept the camera on Fisk instead. This play was perhaps the most important catalyst in getting camera operators to focus most of their attention on the players themselves, and resulted in many future memorable World Series moments involving, among others, Kirk Gibson (1988), Joe Carter (1993) and Edgar Rentería (1997).

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