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Category Archives: St. Louis Cardinals

Ted Simmons – 1973 Topps #85

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TImageed Lyle Simmons (born August 9, 1949 in Highland Park, Michigan) is an American former professional baseball player and coach. Simmons was a catcher for most of his Major League Baseball career with the St. Louis Cardinals, the Milwaukee Brewers and the Atlanta Braves. He was often overshadowed by Johnny Bench, Simmons is considered one of the best hitting catchers in Major League baseball history. He didn’t possess Bench’s power hitting ability,  but he hit for a higher batting average. ImageSimmons was selected by the St. Louis Cardinals as their first round pick in the 1967 Major League Baseball Draft. He made his major league debut with the Cardinals, appearing in two games during the 1968 pennant-winning season. Simmons spent another year in Triple-A baseball before returning to the major leagues in 1970. He finished 16th in balloting for the 1971 National League Most Valuable Player Award as the Cardinals finished in second place behind the Pittsburgh Pirates in the National League Eastern Division. An eight-time All-Star, he batted above .300 seven times, reached 20 home runs six times, and eight times exceeded 90 runs batted in. He switch-hit home runs in a game three times and established a since-broken National League career record for home runs by a switch-hitter (182).

Red Schoendienst – 1973 Topps #497


Albert Fred “Red” Schoendienst (born February 2, 1923) is an American Major League Baseball coach, former player and manager, and 10-time All-star. After a 19-year playing career with the St. Louis Cardinals (1945–56, 1961–63), New York Giants (1956–57) and Milwaukee Braves (1957–60), Schoendienst managed the Cardinals from 1965 through 1976, the second-longest managerial tenure in the team’s history (behind Tony La Russa’s). Under his direction St. Louis won the 1967 and 1968 National League pennants and the 1967 World Series, and Schoendienst was named National League Manager of the Year in both ’67 and ’68. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1989 by the Veterans Committee. Schoendienst remains with the Cardinals as Special Assistant Coach; as of 2011 he has worn a Major League uniform as a player, coach or manager for 66 consecutive seasons. Red Schoendienst was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1989 by the Veterans Committee, and the Cardinals retired his number (2) in 1990. In 1998 he was inducted into the St. Louis Walk of Fame.

Al Hrabosky – 1973 Topps #153


Alan Thomas “Al” Hrabosky(born July 21, 1949) is a former Major League Baseball player from 1970-1982 for the St. Louis Cardinals, Kansas City Royals and Atlanta Braves and is currently the color commentator on Cardinals regular season broadcasts on FSN Midwest. He also owns Al Hrabosky’s Ballpark Saloon, which is located right across the steet from Busch Stadium. Hrabosky’s nickname is The Mad Hungarian because of his unusual last name and colorful character. Hrabosky became a fan favorite for his antics on the mound. Between each pitch he would turn his back to the batter, walk towards second base, vigorously rub the ball between his palms several times, take a deep breath, and pound the ball into his mitt. He would then storm back to the mound, staring down the batter. Although the crowd would roar in delight, most batters were not fond of the pitcher’s routine. Hrabosky’s best year was 1975 when he led the National League in saves with 22 (a career best) en route to winning the Sporting News “NL Fireman of the Year” award. After eight seasons in St. Louis, the Cardinals traded Hrabosky to the Kansas City Royals. Following just two years with the Royals, he was released and signed with the Atlanta Braves. During his time with the Braves he saw diminished playing time and recorded just seven saves over three seasons. Hrabosky signed with the Chicago White Sox during Spring Training in 1983 but retired before the season began. In 13 seasons he recorded 64 wins, 35 losses, and 97 saves with an ERA of 3.10. Early in his career with the Cardinals, Hrabosky enhanced his menacing appearance with long hair, and a Fu Manchu moustache. However, when Vern Rapp became the Cardinals manager in 1977, Hrabosky had to cut his hair and shave the moustache.

St. Louis Cardinals 1974 Team Photo – 1974 Topps #36

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The St. Louis Cardinals are a professional baseball team based in St. Louis, Missouri. They are members of the Central Division in the National League of Major League Baseball. The Cardinals have won eleven World Series championships, the most of any National League team, and second overall only to the New York Yankees, who have won twenty-seven. They have played in eighteen. They are the defending World Series champions, having won the 2011 World Series in seven games over the Texas Rangers. The Cardinals were founded in the American Association in 1882 as the St. Louis Brown Stockings, taking the name from an earlier National League team. They joined the National League in 1892 and have been known as the Cardinals since 1900. The club quickly achieved success, winning four AA pennants in a row in 1885–1888. St. Louis played in an early version of the World Series, the first two times against the National League’s Chicago White Stockings, now named the Chicago Cubs. The 1885 series ended in dispute, but St. Louis won the 1886 series outright, beginning a St. Louis-Chicago rivalry that continues today. The American Association went bankrupt in 1892, and the Browns moved to the National League, leaving much of their success behind for the next three decades.

St. Louis Cardinals 1973 Team Photo – 1973 Topps #219

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The St. Louis Cardinals were founded in 1882 as a member of the American Association called the St. Louis Brown Stockings. The club quickly achieved success, winning four AA pennants in a row in 1885–1888. St. Louis played in an early version of the World Series, the first two times against the National League’s Chicago White Stockings, now named the Chicago Cubs. The 1885 series ended in dispute, but St. Louis won the 1886 series outright, beginning a St. Louis-Chicago rivalry that continues today. The American Association went bankrupt in 1892, and the Browns moved to the National League, leaving much of their success behind for the next three decades. The club changed its name to the “Perfectos” in 1899, before adopting the “Cardinals” name in 1900. From 1902–1954, an American League team, the St. Louis Browns, also played in St. Louis. The Browns moved to Baltimore in 1954 and became the Baltimore Orioles. The Cardinals’ fortunes in the National League began to improve in 1920, when Sam Breadon bought the club and named Branch Rickey his general manager. Rickey immediately moved the Cardinals to Sportsman’s Park to become tenants of their American League rivals, the St. Louis Browns, and sold the Cardinals’ ballpark. Rickey used the money from the sale to invest in and pioneer the minor league farm system, which produced many great players and led to new success for the Cardinals. Led by Rogers Hornsby, who won the Triple Crown in both 1922 and 1925, the Cardinals improved dramatically during the 1920s. They won their first National League pennant in 1926 and then defeated the favored New York Yankees in seven games to win the World Series. In 1927, now led by Frankie Frisch, the Cardinals fell just short, before claiming another pennant in 1928. The Cardinals kept winning in the next decade, claiming back-to-back pennants in 1930 and 1931. The Cardinals matched up with the Philadelphia Athletics in both World Series, losing in 1930 but returning to win the 1931 series. In 1934 the team, nicknamed the “Gashouse Gang” for their shabby appearance and rough tactics, again won the pennant and then the World Series over the Detroit Tigers. Dizzy Dean won 30 games that season, the last National League pitcher to reach that mark. Joe Medwick won the Triple Crown in 1937, the last National League hitter to achieve the feat, but the Cardinals failed to win a pennant in the second half of the decade.

Bob Gibson – 1974 Topps #350


Robert “Bob” Gibson (born November 9, 1935) is a retired American professional baseball player. Nicknamed “Hoot” and “Gibby”, he was a right-handed pitcher who played his entire 17-year Major League Baseball career with St. Louis Cardinals (1959–1975). A nine-time All-Star selection, Gibson accumulated 3,117 strikeouts during his career, won two Cy Young Awards, was named the National League’s Most Valuable Player (MVP) in 1968, and was a member of two World Series championship teams. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1981, his first year of eligibility. Gibson was the starting pitcher in nine World Series games during his career, in which he recorded eight complete games and seven wins. Gibson also set a World Series record by posting 17 strikeouts during Game 1 of the 1968 World Series. After retiring as a player in 1975, Gibson later served as pitching coach for his former teammate Joe Torre. At one time a special instructor coach for the St. Louis Cardinals as well, Gibson was later selected for the Major League Baseball All-Century Team in 1999.

Ozzie Smith – 1991 Donruss #240

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Osborne Earl “Ozzie” Smith (born December 26, 1954) is an American former baseball shortstop who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the San Diego Padres and St. Louis Cardinals from 1978 to 1996. Nicknamed “The Wizard” for his defensive brilliance, Smith set major league records for career assists (8,375) and double plays (1,590) by a shortstop (the latter since broken by Omar Vizquel), as well as the National League (NL) record with 2,511 career games at the position; Smith won the NL Gold Glove Award for play at shortstop for 13 consecutive seasons (1980–1992). A 15-time All-Star, he accumulated 2,460 hits and 580 stolen bases during his career, and won the NL Silver Slugger Award as the best-hitting shortstop in 1987. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility in 2002.

St.Louis Cardinals – 1973 Topps #219

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The Cardinals  were founded in 1882 as a member of the American Association called the St. Louis Brown Stockings. The club quickly achieved success, winning four AA pennants in a row in 1885–1888. St. Louis played in an early version of the World Series, the first two times against the National League’s Chicago White Stockings, now named the Chicago Cubs. The 1885 series ended in dispute, but St. Louis won the 1886 series outright, beginning a St. Louis-Chicago rivalry that continues today. The American Association went bankrupt in 1892, and the Browns moved to the National League, leaving much of their success behind for the next three decades. The club changed its name to the “Perfectos” in 1899, before adopting the “Cardinals” name in 1900.

Bob Gibson – 1973 Topps #190

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Robert “Bob” Gibson(born November 9, 1935) is a retired American professional baseball player. Nicknamed “Hoot” and “Gibby”, he was a right-handed pitcher who played his entire 17-year Major League Baseball career with St. Louis Cardinals (1959–1975). A nine-time All-Star selection, Gibson accumulated 3,117 strikeouts during his career, won two Cy Young Awards, was named the National League’s Most Valuable Player (MVP) in 1968, and was a member of two World Series championship teams. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1981, his first year of eligibility.

Lou Brock – 1973 Topps #320

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Louis Clark “Lou” Brock(born June 18, 1939) is a former American professional baseball player. He began his Major League Baseball career with the Chicago Cubs but, spent the majority of his career as the left fielder for the St. Louis Cardinals. Brock was best known for breaking Ty Cobb’s all-time major league stolen base record. He is currently a special instructor coach for the St. Louis Cardinals. Brock was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1985.

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