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Category Archives: Tigers

Dick McAuliffe – 1973 Topps #349

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Richard John McAuliffe(born November 29, 1939) is a former American professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball as a shortstop and second baseman for the Detroit Tigers from 1960 to 1973 and for the Boston Red Sox from 1974 to 1975. He was a part of the Tigers’ 1968 World Series championship, and was known for his unusual batting stance. A left-handed hitter, he held his hands very high with a stance that faced the pitcher. As the pitcher delivered to home plate, McAuliffe moved his forward (right) foot to a more conventional position for his swing. In the Tigers’ 1968 World Championship season, McAuliffe played a key role. He had a .344 on base percentage, led the American League with 95 runs scored, and showed power with 50 extra base hits. He also tied a major league record by going the entire 1968 season without grounding into a double play. McAuliffe also improved defensively in 1968, reducing his error total from 28 in 1967 to nine in 1968 and, finished second among American League second basemen in fielding percentage. He finished seventh in the 1968 American League Most Valuable Player Award voting, behind teammates Denny McLain, Bill Freehan, and Willie Horton.  On August 22, 1968, McAuliffe was involved in a brawl with White Sox pitcher Tommy John. After one pitch barely missed McAuliffe’s head, and another was thrown behind him, McAuliffe charged the mound, drove his knee into John’s shoulder and separated it. John was out for the season, and McAuliffe was suspended for five games. Interviewed 30 years later, McAuliffe was still convinced John was throwing at his head: “The first pitch at me was right at my head, and I mean right at my head. The catcher never laid any leather on it, and it hit the backstop. The next pitch, he spun me down, threw it behind me. In the 1968 World Series, McAuliffe played all seven games at second base, scored 5 runs, and had 6 hits, 4 walks, 3 RBIs, and a home run. His steadying influence in the middle infield helped make it possible for manager Mayo Smith to take the radical step of playing center fielder Mickey Stanley at shortstop in the World Series in order to get a better bat in the lineup against the St. Louis Cardinals, led by Bob Gibson.

Detroit Tigers 1974 Team Photo – 1974 Topps #94

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The Detroit Tigers are a Major League Baseball team located in Detroit, Michigan. One of the American League’s eight charter franchises, the club was founded in Detroit in 1894 as part of the Western League. The Tigers have won four World Series championships (1935, 1945, 1968 and 1984) and have won the American League pennant 10 times. The team currently plays their home games at Comerica Park in Downtown Detroit. The Tigers constructed Bennett Park at the corner of Michigan Avenue and Trumbull Avenue and began playing there in 1896. In 1912, the team moved into Navin Field, which was built on the same location. It was expanded in 1938 and renamed Briggs Stadium. It was renamed Tiger Stadium in 1961 and the Tigers played there until moving to Comerica Park in 2000. The club is a charter member of the American League, one of four clubs (with the Boston Red Sox, Chicago White Sox and Cleveland Indians) still located in its original city. Detroit is also the only member of the Western League, the AL’s minor league predecessor, that remains in its original city under its original name. It was established as a charter member in 1894. There are various legends about how the Tigers got their nickname. One involves the orange stripes they wore on their black stockings. Tigers manager George Stallings took credit for the name; however, the name appeared in newspapers before Stallings was manager. Another legend concerns a sportswriter equating the 1901 team’s opening day victory with the ferocity of his alma mater, the Princeton Tigers. Richard Bak, in his 1998 book, A Place for Summer: A Narrative History of Tiger Stadium, pp. 46–49, explains that the name originated from the Detroit Light Guard military unit, who were known as “The Tigers”. They had played significant roles in certain Civil War battles and in the 1898 Spanish-American War. The baseball team was still informally called both “Wolverines” and “Tigers” in the news. The earliest known use of the name “Tigers” in the media was in the Detroit Free Press on April 16, 1895. Upon entry into the majors, the ballclub sought and received formal permission from the Light Guard to use its trademark. From that day forth, the team has been officially called the Tigers.

Al Kaline – 1973 Topps #280

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Albert William “Al” Kaline(born December 19, 1934 in Baltimore, Maryland) is a former Major League Baseball right fielder. He is a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame. Kaline played his entire 22-year baseball career with the Detroit Tigers. Kaline still works for the Tigers as a front office official. Because of his lengthy career and longtime association with the Tigers organization, Kaline’s nickname is “Mr. Tiger.”  For most of his career, Kaline played in the outfield, mainly as a right fielder, where he was known for his strong throwing arm. Near the end of his career, he also played as first baseman and, in his last season, was the Tigers’ designated hitter.

Fred Scherman – 1973 Topps #660

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Frederick John Scherman Jr.  (July 25, 1944 – ), was a Major League Baseball relief pitcher for eight years with the Detroit Tigers (1969–1973), Houston Astros (1974–1975), and Montreal Expos (1975–1976). Born in Dayton, Ohio, Scherman was a left-handed pitcher who attended Ohio State University before making his major league debut for the Tigers on April 26, 1969. Scherman pitched in only 4 games in 1969, but became one of the Tigers’ main relief pitchers for the next four years. Between 1970 and 1973, Scherman appeared in 208 games for the Tigers (an average of 52 games per season), with all but four appearances as a reliever.

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