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Category Archives: White Sox

Dick Allen – 1973 Topps #310

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ImageRichard Anthony Allen (born March 8, 1942 in Wampum, Pennsylvania) is a former Major League Baseball player and R&B singer. He played first and third base and outfield in Major League Baseball and ranked among his sport’s top offensive producers of the 1960s and early 1970s. Most notably playing for the Philadelphia Phillies and Chicago White Sox, he led the American League in home runs twice, and led both leagues in slugging average and on base percentage. His .534 career slugging average ranks among the highest in an Imageera marked by low averages. He won the 1964 National League Rookie of the Year and 1972 AL MVP. He also spoke his mind, combatted racism, and bucked organizational hierarchy.
Allen enjoyed several years in Philadelphia, where he was as good as any player in baseball, making All-Star teams from 1965–67  and leading the league in slugging (.632), OPS (1.027) and extra base hits (75) in 1966. Frank Robinson, the American League MVP, won the triple crown for leading the AL in home runs, RBI, and BA in 1966. Yet, Dick Allen had the better season per at-bat.

Wilbur Wood -1973 Topps #150

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ImageWilbur Forrester Wood, Jr. (born October 22, 1941 in Cambridge, Massachusetts) is a former knuckleball pitcher in Major League Baseball for the Boston Red Sox, Pittsburgh Pirates, and most notably the Chicago White Sox, where he got 163 of his 164 wins. He threw left-handed, and batted right-handed.
In 1960, Wood was signed out of Belmont, Massachusetts high school by the Red Sox. He pitched on-and-off for them for a few seasons before being traded to the Pirates in late September 1964. After two seasons with Pittsburgh, he was traded to the White Sox after the 1966 season.  Wood finished second in the 1972 voting for the Cy Young Award, losing a close vote to Gaylord Perry.
In a 17-season career, Wood compiled a 164-156 record with a 3.24 ERA. He had 1411 strikeouts in 2684 innings pitched. He compiled 24 shutouts and 114 complete games in 297 games started. He pitched in 651 games. He was also the last pitcher in American League history to win and lose Image20 or more games in the same season.
Wood was seriously injured in a game against the Detroit Tigers in Tiger Stadium, May 9, 1976, when Ron LeFlore, the Tigers’ center fielder, hit a vicious line drive back toward the mound. The ball struck Wood’s left knee forcibly, shattering his kneecap. He had surgery the next day, but the outlook was bleak. Many predicted that he would never pitch again, but after considerable rehabilitation, he did some pitching for two more seasons with the White Sox. However, he showed few signs of his former mastery. He retired in 1978, moving back to his native New England.

Steve Kealey – 1973 Topps #581


Steven William Kealey(born May 13, 1947 in Torrance, California) was a Major League Baseball pitcher for the California Angels and Chicago White Sox from 1968 to 1973. Kealey had been the most recent White Sox pitcher to hit a home run in a game until Jon Garland hit one in a game against the Cincinnati Reds on June 18, 2006. The 6 ft, 185 lb Kealey appeared in 139 Major League games, four as a starting pitcher. He had one complete game, one shutout, 11 saves and 126 strikeouts in 214⅓ innings pitched, allowing 219 hits and 69 bases on balls.

Chicago White Sox 1973 Team Photo – 1973 Topps #481

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The Chicago White Soxare a Major League Baseball team located in Chicago, Illinois.The White Sox play in the American League’s Central Division. Since 1991, the White Sox have played in U.S. Cellular Field, which was originally called New Comiskey Park and nicknamed The Cell by local fans. The White Sox are one of two major league clubs based in Chicago, the other being the Chicago Cubs of the National League. The White Sox last won the World Series in 2005 when they played the Houston Astros and swept them in four games. One of the American League’s eight charter franchises, the Chicago team was established as a major league baseball club in 1900. The club was originally called the Chicago White Stockings, after the nickname abandoned by the Cubs, and the name was soon shortened to Chicago White Sox, believed to have been because the paper would shorten it to Sox in the headlines. At this time, the team played their home games at South Side Park. In 1910, the team moved into historic Comiskey Park, which they would inhabit for more than eight decades. The White Sox were a strong team during their first two decades, winning the 1906 World Series with a defense-oriented team dubbed “the Hitless Wonders”, and the 1917 World Series led by Eddie Cicotte, Eddie Collins, and Shoeless Joe Jackson. The 1919 World Series, however, was marred by the Black Sox Scandal, in which several prominent members of the White Sox (including Cicotte and Jackson) were accused of conspiring with gamblers to purposefully lose games. Baseball’s new commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis took decisive action, banning the tainted players from Major League Baseball for life. Decades of mediocrity followed for the White Sox until the 1950s, when perennially competitive teams were blocked from the playoffs by the dynastic New York Yankees, with the exception of the 1959 pennant winners led by Early Wynn, Nellie Fox, Luis Aparicio, and manager Al Lopez. Another pennant winner did not come until their championship season of 2005, when the White Sox won their first World Series championship in 88 years, breaking their epochal drought only a year after the Boston Red Sox had broken their slightly shorter but more celebrated “curse.”

Bucky Dent – 1974 Topps #582


Russell Earl “Bucky” Dent  (born Russell Earl O’Dey; November 25, 1951), is a former American Major League Baseball player and manager. He earned two World Series rings as the starting shortstop for the New York Yankees in 1977 and 1978, and was voted the World Series MVP in 1978. Dent is most famous for his home run in a tie-breaker game against the Boston Red Sox at the end of the 1978 season. Dent is widely remembered for hitting a three-run homer that gave the Yankees a 3-2 lead in the 1978 AL East division playoff game against the Boston Red Sox. It was notable because he was not known as a power hitter, having hit just 40 home runs in 12 years in the major leagues, and occupying the ninth spot in the batting order. The Yankees went on to win the game 5-4, securing the division title in the process. Dent batted .417 in the 1978 World Series, earning Series Most Valuable Player honors as the Yankees defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers, four games to two. In 1979, Dent posed for a pin-up poster. That year he also appeared in the TV movie Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders, portraying a Cowboys wide receiver who was the love interest of Jane Seymour’s character. He appeared, wearing a swimsuit, in the September 1983 issue of Playgirl magazine.

Sammy Sosa – 1991 Donruss #147

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Samuel Peralta “Sammy” Sosa (born November 12, 1968) is a former Dominican Republic Major League Baseball right fielder. Sosa’s Major League career began with the Texas Rangers in 1989. After a stint with the Chicago White Sox, Sosa became a member of the Chicago Cubs in 1992 and subsequently became one of the league’s best hitters. In 1998, Sosa and Mark McGwire achieved national fame for their home run-hitting prowess in pursuit of Roger Maris’ home run record. Although a fan favorite, Sosa fell out of favor in Chicago after he was caught using a corked bat in a 2003 game and later left the team during the final game of the 2004 season. Sosa finished his career with brief stints with the Baltimore Orioles and the Texas Rangers. With the Rangers, Sosa hit his 600th career home run to become the fifth player in MLB history to reach the milestone. He is also the all-time home run leader among foreign-born MLB players. Furthermore, Sosa is one of only two National League Players to ever reach 160 RBI, a milestone he reached in 2001. The other was Cubs player and RBI Champion Hack Wilson during his record setting 1930 season in which he hit 191 RBI. Sosa is the only player to have hit 60 or more home runs in a single season three times. Sosa has long been the subject of speculation about suspected anabolic steroid use during his playing career. On June 16, 2009, The New York Times reported that Sosa had failed a test for performance enhancing drugs in 2003.

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