RSS Feed

Don Money – 1973 Topps #386

Posted on

   Donald Wayne Money (born June 7, 1947 in Washington, D.C., United States) He currently serves as the special instructor of player development for the Milwaukee Brewers. Money spent most of his career as a third baseman and was a four-time All-Star. Known as one of the best defensive third basemen of the era, he batted and threw right-handed. He played for the Philadelphia Phillies and the Milwaukee Brewers. He briefly played for the Kintetsu Buffaloes in Japan for one month at the end of his career. In a 16-season career, Money hit .261 with 176 home runs and 729 RBIs in 1,720 games. He had a lifetime on-base percentage of .328 and a .406 slugging percentage. He also had 80 career stolen bases with 798 runs. He had 1,623 hits in 6,215 at bats.
On April 10, 1971 he hit the first ever home run at Veterans Stadium. On July 7, 1974, he set the major league record for errorless games at third base, with 78. He would go on to complete an 86-game streak with no errors in 257 chances. On April 10, 1976, Money hit a grand slam off Dave Pagan of the New York Yankees, only to see it taken back because the first base umpire had called time before the pitch was delivered.
After retiring from MLB, he contracted with the Kintetsu Buffaloes in the Japanese Professional League. Money had watched many games of the Yomiuri Giants and noted the large crowds and their beautiful stadium. Kintetsu had a dilapidated stadium, however, and rarely drew much of a crowd. The team put Money up in a cockroach-ridden apartment rather than a house in a tree-lined setting as he felt he had been promised. After one month Money packed up his family and moved back to his farm in Vineland, New Jersey.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: